Noteworthy U.S. sanctions against Russia since 2012

The United States has imposed dozens of rounds of sanctions against Russian companies and individuals since 2012 for human-rights violations, aggression against Ukraine, meddling in the U.S. election of 2016, running industries that bolster President Vladimir Putin’s regime, or conducting assassination operations against Russians abroad.

Highlights of the sanctions against individuals

2012

The United States has imposed dozens of rounds of sanctions against Russian companies and individuals since 2012 for human-rights violations, aggression against Ukraine, meddling in the U.S. election of 2016, running industries that bolster President Vladimir Putin’s regime, or conducting assassination operations against Russians abroad.

2014

The United States imposed several rounds of sanctions during the year on Russian officials who supported the country’s seizure of Crimea in the spring of 2014 and the pro-Russian separatist rebellion in eastern Ukraine. Each round added more individuals. The rounds started in March with sanctions against 18 people in Putin’s inner circle who supported Russia’s seizure of Crimea. Additional rounds of sanctions were imposed in April, June, July and September against powerful or wealthy individuals who supported the Crimea seizure and the separatist rebellion.

2016

The United States imposed sanctions in December on four top officials of Russia’s military intelligence division, the GRU, for ordering the hacking of the Democratic National Committee’s servers to try to influence the November 8 U.S. election. It also ordered the expulsion of 35 Russian operatives based in the Russian Embassy in Washington.

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2017

In August the United States enacted legislation aimed at punishing Russians who engage in corruption, human-rights violations, and cyber warfare against the United States, including meddling in U.S. elections. The legislation also authorizes sanctions against powerful Russians in the defense, intelligence, energy and financial sectors. The idea is to target for sanctions more of those in Putin’s inner circle and more of the oligarchs who benefit from his policies. One of the legislation’s provisions was for Congress to draw up, and the executive branch to approve, a list of individuals who would be prime sanctions targets.

2018

In January of 2018, Congress gave the Trump administration a list of about 200 Russians considered prime targets for sanctions. The administration replaced the list with one of its own that contained 210 names. The new list was almost evenly split between people in Putin’s inner circle and oligarchs. In April the United States sanctioned 17 officials and seven oligarchs on the list. In December the United States sanctioned two Russian civilian intelligence agents whom Britain accused of using a poison to try to assassinate former Russian counter-intelligence agent Sergei Skripal in London. It also sanctioned several Russian military intelligence agents who hacked into World Anti-Doping Agency databases to tamper with athletes’ records. The agency has accused Russia of blatant attempts to conceal widespread doping among Russian athletes taking part in international competitions.

Author: Gage Skidmore from Peoria, AZ, United States of America

Author: Solundir

2019

The United States sanctioned six Russians. Some were involved in the Russian navy’s seizure of Ukrainian ships in the Kerch Strait in November 2018. Others were linked to oppression in Russian-occupied Crimea and eastern Ukraine. The Kerch Strait is a narrow stretch of water connecting the Black and Azov seas, both of which border Ukraine and Russia.